Skyrocketing Drug Prices a Persistent Problem in Traditional Health Care

 

Skyrocketing Drug Prices a Persistent Problem in Traditional Health Care

Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom: Who’s to Blame? But There Is
 a Light at the End of the Tunnel and a Way to Health Freedom

ST. PAUL, Minn.—The far-reaching and heated debate over the $600 EpiPen has created a national conversation about ridiculously high—and skyrocketing even higher—drug prices. And now two lawsuits have been filed.

Who’s to blame? Drug companies? Big Insurance? Big Government? Even the patients themselves?

Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom (CCHF, www.cchfreedom.org) is working to secure health freedom for all—from understanding the threat of Obamacare and compromised patient privacy to out-of-control insurance premiums and drug prices that keep climbing higher and higher.

CCHF president and co-founder Twila Brase recently penned an oped for The Hill on the EpiPen controversy and how the story also translates to other matters within a broken health care system.

“Many drugs are becoming so astronomically expensive that it raises moral implications, and now the public and some doctors are successfully revolting,” Brase wrote. “The real lesson here is that third-party payment allows prices to go higher than the public would willingly pay. To keep health care prices at the pocketbook level, third-party payment must be limited to catastrophic coverage aimed solely at protecting against major financial losses. That’s how every other insurance policy works, and that’s what keeps services and insurance much more affordable.”

Some doctors have had enough and are escaping this extremely flawed system of high prices and out-of-control payments to and from third-party payers, Brase says.

CCHF’s The Wedge of Health Freedom (www.JointheWedge.com), includes a map of doctors and other medical professionals that patients around the country can use to find practices where physicians have said ‘no’ to costly and restrictive insurance contracts and government regulations.

Around the nation, tucked in small towns and across big cities, doctor’s offices and medical clinics are already operating by these health freedom-embracing principles, but are largely invisible to the public. Patients either don’t know they exist or don’t know how to find them.

CCHF, however, recently unveiled the first wave of practices that have joined The Wedge of Health Freedom, a free-trade zone for health care where doctors are not bound by the shackles of government health care nor restrictive contracts with managed care corporations.

There are now about 140 Wedge practices in nearly 40 states, with more joining all the time. An online interactive map at JointheWedge.com allows patients to search by city, state and zip code for practices in their area. Pinpoints on the map list the practice name, address, phone number and web site so patients can more easily find these practices—and doctors can better reach new patients.

Inside The Wedge, for example, a doctor who truly knows his or her patients—including their capabilities and what they can afford—might prescribe the very affordable epinephrine drug and two syringes that cost just pennies on the dollar, rather than the $600 EpiPen.

“Doctors inside The Wedge figure out how to make things happen for their patients, because a real patient-doctor relationship exists, and the best interests of the patient are at the core—not the best interests of insurance plans, pharmaceutical companies or the government,” Brase said. “And these benefits go far beyond a problem like the EpiPen. Doctors running ‘Wedge practices’ have many ways to truly help their patients with costs and choices, because they are working for them—and no one else.”

CCHF is a national patient-centered health freedom organization existing to protect health care choices, individualized patient care, and medical and genetic privacy rights. For more information about CCHF, visit its web site at www.cchfreedom.org.

Source: Citizens Council for Health Freedom

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